Steelbook Sale!!! 


So the time has come for me to clean house. I’m having a huge steelbook clearance sale, all titles listed below. 
*UPDATED LIST*

List of steelbooks for sale. Please note none of the steelbooks have backing cards, and a couple may have very slight scratches, but mostly they are in great condition.

All prices include free postage inside the UK only, but PayPal fees are *NOT* included. Pictures available on request of individual titles. 

Team America – £10
The Road – £10

Godzilla (1997) – £10

Only God Forgives – £10

The Martian – £15

La Haine – £10

Training Day – £10

I Am Legend – £15 (REGION A LOCKED)

Poltergeist – £10

Money Monster – £12

Tombstone – £12

Seraphim Falls – £10

Paul – £15

Teen Wolf – £10

The Mermaid *Stephen Chow*- £15

’71 – £10

Scanners – £15

The Matrix – £15

Rise of the Footsoldier – £5

The Game – £15

A History of Violence – £10 (REGION A LOCKED)

2 Guns – £12

Manhunter – £12

Anchorman – £10

Predestination – £10

The Raid: Redemption *POP ART* – £15 (REGION A LOCKED)

The Raid 2 – £17

Miller’s Crossing – £10

The Conjuring 2 – £15

Tron: Legacy – £30

Tron – £20

Beverly Hills Cop – £10

Re-Animator – £15

Robocop (2014) – £10

Olympus Has Fallen – £10

London Has Fallen – £15

Gone in 60 Seconds – £20

Goldeneye – £20

Seven Samurai – £15

Ted – £12

Nightcrawler – £15

Moon – £10

E.T – £20

The Omen – £10

Dead Rising: Watchtower – £10

The Mutant Chronicles *Steelpak German release* – £25

Planet of the Apes *ORIGINAL* – £10

Taxi Driver – £15

Unknown – £10

Creed – £15

Lockout – £10

Pan’s Labyrinth – £20

Divergent – £15 (REGION A LOCKED)

Insurgent – £15 (REGION A LOCKED)

Legend *Tom Hardy* – £20

Face/Off – £12

Iron Sky *EXTENDED CUT* – £12

The Equaliser – £12

The Gunman – £10

Alpha Papa – £7

There Will Be Blood £25

The is Spinal Tap – £15

The Wolf of Wall Street – £15

The Guest – £12

The Green Hornet – £15

30 Days of Night – £10

A Streetcar Named Desire – £10

Iron Man Trilogy *FRENCH RELEASE* – £30

Transformers – £25

Transformers: ROTF – £15

Transformers: DOTM – £15

Transformers: AOE – £15

Apocalypto – £10

Seven Psychopaths – £10

Byzantium – £10

White of the Eye – £10

Black Sunday – £10

Theatre of Blood – £10

Star Trek Into Darkness – £15

Star Trek – £10

Vanishing Point – £10

Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid – £10

28 Days Later – £15

28 Weeks Later – £15

End of Watch – £10

The Amazing Spiderman 2 – £12

Straight Outta Compton – £20

Dr Strangelove *POP ART* – £12

The Great Gatsby – £10

Batman vs Superman 3D Extended Cut – £25

The Entity – £15

Krampus *GERMAN RELEASE* – £20

Young Guns – £12

A Nightmare Before Christmas – £20

Bronson – £15

Mask of Zorro – £12

The Untouchables – £29

Man With the Iron Fists – £12

The Hurt Locker – £15

Clerks – £10

White House Down – £10

Sunshine – £10

Total Recall *Colin Farrell* – £15

The A-Team – £10

The Last Witch Hunter -£10

Faster – £10

Looper – £15

The Bourne Legacy – £7

The Ultimate Bourne Collection *TRILOGY* – £30

The Town – £12

Oblivion – £10

Gone Baby Gone £10

The Deer Hunter – £10

Independence Day – £10

Brick – £10

Die Hard – £15

Die Hard 2 – £15

Die Hard with a Vengeance – £15

Die Hard 4.0 – £15

A Good Day to Die Hard *extended cut* – £15

Odd Thomas *German release* – £15

Jurassic Park – £15

The Lost World – £15

Jurassic Park 3 – £15

Spider-Man Trilogy – £30

Kill Bill Vol.1 & 2 – £20

Brazil – £12

The Princess Bride – £15

Taken 2 – £12

The Wicker Man – £15

Sin City – £25

Sin City 2 *German release* – £20

Good Will Hunting – £15

Hellboy – £15

Hellboy 2 – £20

Frankenweenie – £15

The Lone Ranger – £15

Wild at Heart – £15

Fargo – £15

Pitch Black – £15

Ninja: Shadow of a Tear *German release * – £20

Nosferatu – £15

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Manhattan Baby (1982)


When an archaeologist, Dr. George Hacker (Christopher Connelly) opens a tomb in Egypt, he unleashes an evil spirit which latches onto his young daughter. Upon the family’s arrival in New York, a series of grisly murders and strange occurrences begin to take place. 

An amulet which is give to the young girl may hold the secret to the identity of the spirit and how the family can free themselves from its clutches. This is certainly a strange movie, and it looks very dated. The effects are certainly ropey in places, which I believe was down to the production company not getting all of the budget they requested. 


Lucio Fulci had a good few movies out during the 80’s and a lot of them are cult classics like The Beyond, The New York Ripper and Zombie Flesh Eaters to name but a few. Sadly this is not up there with his greatest hits. That’s not to say it isn’t entertaining, because it is, but it’s just not as memorable. It’s nice to see Lucio Fulci use proper locations to tell the story, rather than wooden sets, and the cast give 100% in every scene.   

There is some decent gore on offer, one place where Fulci has always delivered in my humble opinion. I did notice that it stars that annoying blonde kid from Fulci’s other great horror ‘The House by the Cemetery’, and he has an encounter with some scorpions which was hilarious to watch. There is a lot to like about these Italian horrors though. I love the dodgy dubbing over each actors original voice, and the hammy acting on display always makes things fun to watch. The effects are fun too, like the dodgy stuffed birds dangling on wires. 


Manhattan Baby is certainly worth a watch for fans of Lucio Fulci’s work, but it’s sure to divide those that love his other movies. Manhattan Baby is available now on DVD from the fine folks over at Shameless Screen Entertainment:

http://www.shameless-films.com/shop/Manhattan-Baby.html

3/5

JM

Albert Pyun – Moviemaker 

 Those of you out there that love trashy movies, movies with cyborgs or movies set in post apocalyptic wastelands, then chances are you’ve seen Albert Pyun’s work at least once. My first foray into the work of Albert Pyun was the Jean-Claude Van Damme action movie ‘Cyborg’ back in 1992. I had already been a Van Damme fan at this point, but I loved the whole post apocalyptic setting and after watching it, I set out to find more of Pyun’s work.
  
My next stop was Dollman starring Tim Thomerson, and also an early role for Jackie Earle Haley. This was a crazy movie, with Thomerson as an intergalactic space cop who crash lands on earth. However whereas he is normal size on his home planet, he is only doll size on Earth. After befriending a woman and her son, Dollman must protect them from an angry gang and other enemies that seek to cause them harm. It was great fun with some good effects. Although I must say the effects have aged badly now that we are in the realms of high end CGI. 
  
After Dollman I found out that Pyun had directed a Captain America movie, which I was very eager to see. At the time I remember really enjoying it, but again now that we have CGI and Chris Evans as Cap, it just doesn’t hold up well to repeated viewings. Albert Pyun does well with limited funds, and this is something that is true with all of his movies. He’s a man who’s creativity seeps forth from every frame, and who’s passion for movies is so infectious, that you can’t help but admire the man. He is inspiring because he adapts to whatever restrictions may be placed on him, which is usually in the form of limited budgets. 
  
Brain Smasher: A Love Story was the next film I stumbled across. Andrew Dice Clay stars as a bouncer who has to protect Teri Hatcher from Shaolin Monks. There’s a bit more to it, but that’s the basic gist of the story. It’s not the best film I’ve ever seen, and to be fair probably not something I would watch again anytime soon. That said it was cheap to buy so I can’t complain too much. Only recently have I stumbled across the Nemesis series. So far I’ve only watched the first one, and I must say I thoroughly enjoyed it. Oliver Gruner stars as a cyborg cop who is tasked by his boss to find and subdue some cyborg terrorists. It’s pretty basic stuff story wise, but the action and stunts are top shelf and I must say that this is my second favourite Pyun movie, just behind Cyborg with Van Damme. 
  
Another Albert Pyun movie I have recently watched is Mean Guns starring Ice T and Christopher Lambert. It’s about a group of villains gathered together in a prison, forced to fight to the death for $10million dollars. It’s got good action, but the dialogue feels very forced, and Ice T isn’t the best actor in the world. He pretty much seems to play the same character in every movie I’ve seen him in. 
  
I’m happy to say that Albert Pyun is still making movies, but health issues have required him to slow his output down just a tad. I do hope we get to see many more of his movies for a long while yet. He really does dig deep and deliver his best effort, even if the end result isn’t always something you’d watch again in a hurry. It’s that kind of willingness to entertain that I find very admirable, and is why he is a director I have a lot of time for. There are still plenty more of Albert Pyun’s movies out there for me to discover, for that I am both thankful and excited. 
  
I’d like to thank 101 Films for the Nemesis boxset and Mean Guns. They are both available to purchase now via https://101-films-store.myshopify.com/

 
JM

Stung (2015)

  
Julie (Jessica Cook) and Paul (Matt O’Leary) are on their way out to the American countryside to cater a fancy party. However things take a turn for the sinister when a wasp nest is disturbed and the partygoers are set upon by giant mutated wasps. 

  
The wasps tear through the party, forcing some to retreat to the house in a desperate fight for their lives. Lance Henriksen plays the Mayor, Carruthers and the home owner is played by Clifton Collins Jr. The practical effects and gore are done very well. There is mild CGI, but this is a film that understands its core audience and also pays homage to the horror films of the 80’s, so the CGI is used sparingly and mainly just to show the wasps flying. 

  
More of a horror comedy, than a straight horror, there are some laugh out loud moments, particularly from Henriksen who seems to be enjoying himself. Some may recognise Matt O’Leary from another one of my favourite horrors ‘Frailty’. He plays the part of the reluctant hero quite well, and throws himself into the role. Jessica Cook is okay, but just feels like the generic damsel in distress, despite the films best efforts to make her appear otherwise. Clifton Collins Jr. is great as the hunchbacked Sydney, the homeowner with a dark secret. He seems to be able to slip into any role with ease and I’m always pleased to see him on screen. 

  
Lovers of old school horror comedy will find plenty to like here, however it’s not hard to see why this has gone straight to DVD here in the UK, as it lacks in places. That said I still recommend you give it a watch as it’s perfect beer and pizza entertainment. This copy of Stung was generously provided by the folks over at http://www.fetch.fm, and is available to pre order now with a release of October 26th….just in time for Halloween. 

  

3/5

JM

Blood and Black Lace (1964)

 
Directed by Mario Bava, Blood and Black Lace was one of the first giallo’s to be released, but not *the* first as my good friend Kat Ellinger over at http://thegoresplatteredcorner.com/ pointed out to me. I’ll be honest I wasn’t really a fan of some of Bava’s other work like Lisa and the Devil. However that being said Blood and Black Lace really did it for me. 

 
When a beautiful young model is murdered and her body found in a salon the finger is pointed at many who knew her. When her diary is later found it causes many to become worried, as they fear there may be something that could implicate them inside the diary. However has the bodies pile up, and more grisly murders take place, it’s clear there is something far more sinister at play. A masked maniac stalks the women, bumping them off one by one, with the police oblivious to who could be responsible. 

 
Director Mario Bava’s use of colour is extrordinary. They literally pop off the screen, with red being the most prevelant colour. The transfer from Arrow Video is nothing short of sublime. The blacks are rich and deep and the close ups of each actor are vibrant to say the least. It looks like a movie that was made last year and not 51 years ago. My only gripe is the music. Not that it’s terrible, because it isn’t. No, my issue is where it’s used in the movie. It’s far too upbeat to create any tension, so when it’s used in the stalking scenes, I just didn’t feel the tension I felt the director may have been trying to create. Though that really is all I can fault this movie for and that’s saying something. 
 
The acting is great and not at all hammy, like it can be in some Italian movies I’ve seen. The costume and set design is wonderful, and you really do wish you could just step into the movie just for one moment. This copy of Blood and Black Lace was generously provided by the folks at http://www.arrowfilms.co.uk/ and is available to purchase now. It’s available in a steelbook release or in a reversible sleeve jewel case. Personally I’d choose the sublime reversible sleeve with the beautiful Graham Humphreys artwork. 

5/5

JM

  

Maniac Cop sixth scale statue coming soon. 

 

Coming soon is this wonderfully designed Maniac Cop sixth scale statue from the brilliantly talented Jason Davenport. You can contact him on facebook via his Maniac Cop Madness page (https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=555455091203608&tsid=0.6691747179720551&source=typeahead) should you want to get one made for yourself. 

   

The detail is incredible. Below is a colour picture of what the base looks like. The head has been resculpted as shown in the above pictures. 

 

This is seriously worth getting for all you Maniac Cop fans out there. 

JM 

Captain Rex ‘Phase II Armour’ from Sideshow Collectibles. 

 

As you can see in the above picture, even Captain Rex gives this the thumbs up. What a stunning release this is from the very talented folks over at Sideshow Collectibles. The detail is astounding. There were two releases of Captain Rex, with the first release having him in pristine white armour, and not the battle worn armour you can see in the pictures. That said, I have to say I prefer this one. I love the scuffs and scratches all over his armour. I also like the little notches on his wrists that show you how many enemies he has killed. 

 

The notches are also etched onto the base, which also details Captain Rex’s regiment. Captain Rex can be seen in The Clone Wars series. He is voiced by Dee Bradley Baker in the series, but has the likeness of actor Temuera Morrison who played Jango Fett in the movies, well I think so anyway. 

 

 The head and helmet are interchangeable, but can be a bit fiddly in places. I struggled to fit the head on securely, but the helmet fits on no problem. When I took the Jetpack out of the packaging I did wonder how on earth it would clip on, as there wasn’t any noticeable bits sticking out. I was very pleasantly surprised to find out that it’s magnetised, and actually clips on very nicely. 

 

You get two pistols which can be holstered on Captain Rex’s waist. You also get a very nice blaster rifle which has an underslung shoulder stock. Also included are two grenades and several pairs of interchangeable hands which really add character to the piece. The artists and sculptors at Sideshow really have produced a fine piece here, which will definitely sit proudly amongst my other sixth scale figures. If you are intersted in this figure and would like you get your own, then pop along to http://www.sideshowtoy.com/collectibles/star-wars-captain-rex-sideshow-collectibles-1002221/, where it is available for a very, very reasonable price. Believe me. 

 

I want to thank the fine folks over at http://www.sideshowtoy.com for their generosity in providing this figure for review. It’s thanks to them that I can bring you these fine items to review. Stay tuned for more great toy reviews. 

5/5

JM

 

   

Korea is where it’s at!

This is for all the collectors out there. For me Korea has been the go to place for collectors editions of movies. The folks at Plain Archive, Nova Media and KimchiDVD put so much effort into their releases it’s staggering. 





They’re the logos you want to be looking out for. Seriously, there has been some great releases coming from Korea, with I Saw The Devil from Plain Archive, Drive from Nova Media and the Amelie triple pack from Kimchi being the standouts. 





I highly recommend checking their sites out for upcoming releases. 

JM



Horror Channel interviews Brian Yuzna

Check out the brilliant interview below which the Horror Channel did with Brian Yuzna (director of Society and Bride of Re-Animator). Really great interview in which he hints at a possible sequel to Society.

JM

Brian Yuzna is one of the world’s most prolific and respected genre film-makers and on the eve of RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD 3 receiving its network TV premiere on the Horror Channel, Yuzna gives us some insight into the making of the film, news on the SOCIETY sequel and why he thinks Horror has gone too mainstream.

Dos-Brian Yuzna 1

RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD 3 is broadcast on Saturday Nov 2, 10.40pm.

Q: Did you know from a young age that you wanted to work in the movie industry?

BY: No, I didn’t.  Like most kids, I loved movies; and I saw some scary ones at a young age that really disturbed me.  That gave me an interest in horror for the rest of my life.  But I never imagined that you could actually make a living making movies.  Back then there were no dvd extras and tv shows demonstrating how movies were made. While in high school I had fooled around with a friend’s 8 mm camera and we mostly shot special effects but it wasn’t until I saw Truffaut’s Day For Night that I had an idea of how a movie crew worked.  Many years later I was vacationing with my girl friend and we rode past a big encampment outside of Cartagena , Columbia and I recognized that it was a film shoot.   That evening we left our modest quarters and were eating at a restaurant on the beach when a couple of jeeps drove up with the rowdy actors etc from the shoot.  As they drank and ate and partied I realized that I was on vacation and they were on a job – but they were having more fun than I was.  That’s when I thought maybe making movies was a desirable job!  Cut to a few years later when I was working as an artist and had an art supply store.  I acquired a 16mm Bolex wind up camera and started making a short film – a short film full of fx that turned into a feature.  Although I never took a film class, I learned how to make a movie just by doing it with people who did know how.  The process fascinated me – it was exciting and satisfying.  The movie I made was pretty bad, but I was hooked.  I moved to Los Angeles to make movies.

Q: How did the Return Of The Living Dead III project come together?

BY: Joel Castelberg and Danica Minor contacted me about directing Return 3 – they said they had the rights and thought that I would be a good collaborator.  I was thrilled because I loved both Return of the Living Dead as well as Night of the Living Dead.  In order to set it apart from the plethora of zombie movies that had been made (even back then!) I decided that a zombie should be the main character.  They found a company to finance it and we began listening to pitches from potential screenwriters.  However, when the time came to formalize a deal it turns out that Joel and Danica’s agent was wrong about the rights being in their control – so it all fell apart.  Soon after I mentioned this to Mark Amin, the ceo of Trimark Pictures, and somehow he acquired the rights and offered me the job of directing and producing.  Again, the process of interviewing writers began, but this time it was Trimark who lined them up.  When I met John Penney and heard his pitch, I was immediately sold.  He was the guy.

Q: What did you think of the script the first time you read it?

BY: There never was a first time that I read the script.  John had a ‘pitch’, which was a basic ‘take’ on the movie.  His idea had to do with kids on the run, kind of a Romeo and Juliet, in a world in which the military is experimenting with the living dead as weapons.  I don’t remember exactly the details, but my obsession with having the main character be a zombie fit right into that.  The next step was for John to write a ‘treatment’ to base the screenplay on.  John and I brainstormed the ideas and John organized them into characters and a story.  Then the Trimark development folks would review it.  By the time we got to the screenplay John and I were collaborating very effectively.  John was seamlessly able to satisfy his storytelling ideas as well as mine – and Trimark’s as well.  In fact, for the only time in my moviemaking experience, I had the screenwriter (and co-producer) on the set with me throughout the shoot.  During pre-production John Penney was there to rewrite the script according to the cast, the locations that we found and the ideas that came up with the storyboard artists and fx artists.  So during the filming we were literally shooting the script.

Q: Was it a difficult movie to cast?

BY: It wasn’t a difficult movie to cast because of the support of Trimark.  I feel like they were able to access excellent options for each of the roles.  They were very involved with the casting and fortunately we seemed to be very much on the same page as them regarding the casting ideas.  Trimark had strong ideas about the casting, but never did I feel like I was obliged to accept an actor that wasn’t my choice.  They really were good to work with.  The biggest role of course was Julie – and we were all pretty blown away by Mindy Clarke.  But Trimark was most helpful, I think, with the secondary roles for which they brought in really quality talent.  It is really great that the cast, in my opinion, is uniformly good.

Q: How much of the budget went on special effects?

BY: Not that much – but working with my producing partner Gary Schmoeller (to whom is due a great deal of the credit for the success of the movie) we used an approach for producing the effects that had worked well for us in the past.  Typically fx horror films of that era would hire one fx company to produce all of the fx – the theory being that by giving them all of the fx budget they would be able to dedicate more of there time to your production.  Our approach was the opposite – with limited funds it is better to break the fx down into categories and hire various companies with different strengths.  This meant hiring an fx supervisor (Tom Rainone in this case) to find the appropriate fx artists, make the deals and supervise the work.  Paying a top fx artist for a key fx makes sense – paying the same artist to create background zombies may not be cost effective – a newer fx company might put extra effort into the effect in order to show there stuff.  Some fx artists are experts in prosthetics and others in mechanical devices.  We tried to get the most bang out of our fx budget.

Q: Was it a difficult shoot?

BY: It was a difficult shoot in that we were trying to make a bigger and better movie than we were budgeted for (we always aim higher than our budget).  But the shoot was so well organized (kudos again to Gary Schmoeller), and Trimark were so supportive, and our Director of Photography (Gerry Lively) was so tirelessly resourceful that everything went more or less according to plan.  It was very hard, exhausting work – but the whole crew seemed to be pulling in the same direction, so I really would not categorize it as a ‘difficult’ shoot.

Q: Why do you think the film has built up such a loyal following?

BY: Because it is a really good zombie movie.  I say that as someone who has made a lot of horror movies that I wouldn’t characterize as ‘really good’.  Return 3 has a good clear story and satisfying horror.  Mainly what sets it apart in my book is the love story at the center of it all.  I think it is very romantic, you really feel for Julie and sympathize with Curt’s determination to not let go of her.  I feel like it is a goth romance, a heavy metal tragedy, a young love in a corrupt world.  As a life long horror fan I think that Return 3 holds up as an example of good ‘90s horror.

Q: Horror Channel has also shown films from The Dentist and Re-Animator series of movies, do you think its times these characters came back?

BY: Yes, I do.  Corbin Bernson has tried to get the rights to do a third Dentist – he loves playing that character.  And it would be good see Jeffrey Combs get out the re-animating syringe one more time.  And I have been asked many times about a Re-Animator re-boot.  Problem is, as always, financing.  The business has changed considerably due to the digital revolution.  There just aren’t many Trimarks out there any more.

Q: Have you ever been tempted to make a follow up to your astonishingly original shocker, Society?

BY: I am actively working on it.  Once again it is all about the financing.  My idea for a sequel is to have it take place in these super exclusive late night clubs that they have in Hollywood .  Once you get in there is always a VIP room or a VVIP room that is off limits…

Q: What state do you think the horror movie industry is in at the moment? A victim of its own success, perhaps?

BY: Horror has become so mainstream that it seems to have mostly lost that transgressive creativity that used to make it so exhilarating. Now that Zombie movies have hit the mainstream (the modern equivalent of the ‘Western’?) they have mostly lost the element of the macabre, the disturbing sense of dead things coming wrongly to life, and are now mainly action films about disease and overpopulation.  Vampires are more romantic than horrific.  And extreme violence is the norm almost as an end in itself.  I think that we are at the end of a cycle and that a new kind of horror will grow out of the new production and distribution digital technologies.  We seem to have reached the limit of what the screenplay structure formulas (popularized especially by Syd Field) of the last decades can give us.  Whereas these ideas began as a way to identify the structure of successful movies and learn from them, they have inevitably led to a be treated as a set of rules to follow, rules that can lead to a sameness in screenplay structure that makes you feel like you know what is coming in a film from the early scenes.  The horror genre has a relatively rigorous structure and it may be time for new filmmakers to develop it into more effective directions.  One of the most interesting horror films for me recently was Cabin in the Woods.  It wasn’t very scary, but the way it deconstructed the horror tropes made me think that after that you just cannot make a teenagers in the woods movie again.  The times dictate our fears, and these times are definitely very different from the last few decades.  I am waiting for the new classics to emerge – horror with the effectiveness and artistry of Rosemary’s Baby, The Omen, The Exorcist, The Shining – and the devastating impact of Night of the Living Dead and Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Q: You’re a multi talented person but are you happiest directing, directing or writing?

BY: I am happiest when I am giving form to something I have imagined.  It is the most exhilarating to direct – but if the director is doing stuff that surprises and delights you it is fantastic to produce.  Writing is the fun of brainstorming the original ideas.  When you produce you can stay with the movie for a long time after everyone else is gone. And with producing you can get so many more movies made.  I love collaborating and am happy to take whatever role is available as long as I feel like I am a real member of the creative and organizational team.

Q: So what projects are you working on at the moment?

I am working on the sequels we mentioned above – but also have very interesting multi platform project with John Penney called The Pope.

Brian Yuzna, thank you very much.