Voices of the Damned (2015)

  
When I read ‘The Venus Complex’ by Barbie Wilde, I was enthralled. It was magnificent in every way, and I knew then that the literary and horror fiction world in general, truly had someone special on their hands. So you can probably imagine my glee when I was offered the chance to review Barbie Wilde’s new work, the brilliant short story collection ‘Voices of the Damned’. The opening story is erotically charged and bristling with descriptions of violence, that those who’ve read Barbie’s previous work will have come to expect. 

   

Hellraiser fans will be happy to discover that the ‘Female Cenobite’ actually has a name and a past which is given great detail in this book. It really is an experience worth having, and those of you with a love of horror, violence and the odd dash of erotica will find much to like here.

 

Dotted between each story are pieces of exquisite artwork from folks such as Clive Barker, Nick Percival, Eric Gross and Steve McGinnis, plus a few others. I found myself studying each piece before pressing on with the story and they really do capture the essence of the horrors Barbie Wilde manages to put down on paper.  ‘Voices of the Damned’ is released on October 31st 2015 and is available for preorder now via this link: 

https://www.sstpublications.co.uk/Voices-of-the-Damned.php

*Update* Barbie Wilde has informed me that there’ll be two editions available of Voices of the Damned. A standard hardback release and a deluxe edition. Both will be available via Amazon on 31st October. However, if you order directly from the link above, you will get a free book will all of the artwork inside. Now that’s great news. 
  
5/5

JM

Wes Craven – (1939 – 2015)

  
Just awoke to some terrible news today. Director Wes Craven, who gave new life to the horror genre when he created A Nightmare on Elm Street, has died aged 76 after a battle with brain cancer. This man played a huge part in my growing up. He gave me some of my favourite horror movies such as The People Under the Stairs and The Serpent and the Rainbow, not to mention the obvious one A Nightmare on Elm Street. He also made some gritty horrors in the 1970’s with The Hills Have Eyes and Last House on the Left. Twice when the horror genre was lagging, did he breathe new life into it again when he made New Nightmare in 1994 and also in 1996 when he made Scream. His last movie was Scream 4 in 2011. RIP Wes. 

   
    
 
JM

Interview with Barbara Crampton – Frightfest 2015

  
 

On the eve of Film4 FrightFest 2015, Barbara Crampton talks about part of the ‘horror club’, scary scripts, still doing the laundry and why Abner Pastoll is one to watch.Q: Welcome to FrightFest Barbara. What was your initial reaction when told you were this year’s special Icon guest?

 A: First of all, I want to say thank you for having me. The importance of these film festivals for young directors to get their work seen and recognized is of the upmost importance in today’s film market. The competition to be included in one of the major genre film festivals is extremely high. When I was a young actress there were a handful of festivals where people could showcase their work. Today, there are many genre festivals across the globe that introduce the hungry audiences to their deepest fears, anxieties and monsters in the bedroom. That being said, to be invited to one of the best genre festivals around today, to be remembered for my past horror movies and to share some of my recent work, to support the new young film makers that I have had the wonderful opportunity to work with is very meaningful to me. I have worked in this genre for a long-time but only recently have come to realize how important these movies have been to me and continue to be for so many people. Finally, I feel like I am part of a club I didn’t realize I have been in for a long-time. To be this year’s special guest is an honour and one for which I am truly grateful.

 Q: You have four films at FrightFest. You seem busier than ever. What is the secret to your career longevity?

 A: My longevity is a complete surprise to me. About 15 years ago when I moved up to San Francisco with my husband I thought I was done. I got married, I had two kids back to back; that was something I felt was really missing from my life. So the years with my growing family were very precious and important to me. I completely lost myself in being a mom, happily so. When I got the call to appear in YOU’RE NEXT, I thought it would be a brief diversion from family life. Little did I know how much fun I was going to have playing with all of these burgeoning, creative film makers and that I would easily be lured back a few more times. Currently, I am able to balance my home life and work life. I do have a few other acting jobs coming up and I am producing one movie and have another in development. My family has been incredibly supportive and I, in turn, keep coming back to do their laundry, shop for their back to school supplies and organize their after school activities. I am even planning a get-a-way vacation with my husband! I think for me the longevity is about doing all of these things that I really love, leaving space for all that comes up in life.

 Q: SUN CHOKE is getting a lot of positive reaction and you are brilliant in the film. What made you choose to play that role?

 A: When I first read the script it really scared me, the role I mean. The film is very dark and explores some very fearsome inclinations in one’s psyche. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to go there or even if I could. But it is so different than any other character I have ever played that I didn’t want the fear of playing the role get in the way. So with a lot of trepidation, I said yes and was treated to an amazing, collaborative experience with one of the best actresses I have ever worked with and some of the best material that’s been offered to me. I am glad it’s getting so much positive response. I think the writer/director Ben Cresciman is extremely talented and the production team I worked with was top notch. I am glad my fear didn’t get in the way of being scary.

 Q: WE ARE STILL HERE has been very popular on the festival circuit. Is that because director Ted Geoghegan is a horror buff and knows all the fanboy tricks?

 A: Potentially there’s a small amount of truth to that but is too simplistic a statement to make. My friend Ted has a rich knowledge of the genre, that is true, but he also has a deep heart and soul that can connect to varying characters and their motivations. The story he created works on many levels. It has a grounded foundation in two people’s grief and loss, and many supernatural scares. It has a connection to history, first of the genre and to something endemic to the story. Not to mention the fact that Ted was aided by two of the most important people that made WE ARE STILL HERE a festival favourite, Karim Hussain, our stylish and formidable Director of Photography and our Producer, Travis Stevens whose guidance, smarts and kindness improved every aspect of the film.

  
Q: ROAD GAMES is Abner Pastoll’s feature debut as a director? You seem to like supporting first time directors?

 A: I have worked with one of the best horror directors of the 1980s but I think it’s important to support the young filmmakers of today. They have interesting stories to tell that reflect their state of mind and current popular culture. When Abner reached out to me personally to ask me to play a part in his movie, I read the script and was completely floored by it. It was one of the most well crafted screenplays I ever read and had a unique sense of humour. I think Abner is one to watch in the coming years.

 Q: You only have a small cameo in TALES OF HALLOWEEN. You are in Axelle Carolyn’s episode at a party scene with directors Stuart Gordon and Mick Garris and actress Lisa Marie. Fun to do?

 A: Yes! We had a great evening all together, it is a party scene so we acted like we were at a party. I know these people quite well and we had a great time between set-ups, getting caught up and reminiscing. Two people in the scene that I didn’t know very well were Lin Shaye and Alex Essoe. I was excited to work with both of them as I am a fan of both actresses. I had just seen Alex in STARRY EYES and she impressed me with her work as a starving actress who will do anything to get what she wants. Also, I really wanted to support my friend, Axelle Carolyn. She’s the one who came up with the original premise for TALES OF HALLOWEEN. She put it all together. She’s a woman, she’s fierce and I wanted to help her see her vision realized, no matter how small a part I ultimately had to play. The movie itself has been getting a great response and I am so happy and proud of her.

  
 Q: What keeps drawing you back to the Horror Genre and how do you feel being crowned a ‘Scream Queen’?

 A: Horror movies are like a thrill ride, they’re fun and exciting and you don’t know exactly how your body is going to feel after dipping off the high precipice of some downward spiraled roller coaster of scares. At first I was surprised to find myself in this genre. Then I felt warmed and welcomed by the creatives making these spectacles and also the audiences who appreciate them. It is now a genre that I proudly call my home. I find myself watching more horror movies on my off time than any other genre. In an odd way, I actually feel relaxed after watching one. Your body tenses up and is on high alert and at the end when everything is safe you can finally relax because the hero/heroine has won. Another thing horror movies does for you is prepares you for tragic things to occur, including the loss of a loved one or even your own death. If you can go through the experience of watching a horror movie subjectively than objectively it could soften the potential blow of horrific things to come, you’ve been prepared. People always ask me this question about how I feel being crowned a ‘Scream Queen,’ I don’t know if I have ever come up with the ultimate answer. But the fact that people keep asking me to be involved is completely gratifying and satisfying. You can call me Barbara, Miss Crampton or Miss Queen, just keep calling me…

 Q: You grew up on the Carnival circuit. Can you describe what that was like?

 A: Fun, exciting, weird. We were always in a new town every week so I would make friends with the ride boys, the fried bread dough sellers and the bearded lady. I could ride any ride I wanted on the lot for free, play any game, see any show and I had hundreds of stuffed animals in my room at home. The carnival world was full of questionable and interesting characters mostly living on the fringe of life. A lot of people working in that industry felt like they didn’t belong; being on the road and constantly moving oddly gave them a sense of peace. There was a unity and camaraderie that we all experienced coming from different backgrounds. It enabled me to completely put myself in other’s shoes and be non-judgemental which is one of the greatest gifts my family has ever given me. I hope it continues to afford me the momentum of treating all others with respect and kindness no matter who they are, where they come from, what bodies they choose to inhabit or whom they want to love.

  
 Q: You have a stage background. How important an influence has this been and continues to be?

 A: I am very happy that I had a full education for my acting background. Scene study, character analysis, stage combat, movment, voice lessons. All these things help inform every role I have ever played. To have a classic background and education in acting is something I think is missing in the young actors of today. Everyone seems to just act as who they are naturally. Where is the character development? I think sometimes the British actors are a little more advanced in that area than we are. Working on the stage really prepares you to engage your whole physical being in the process of creating a character.

 Q: We all remember you from RE-ANIMATOR and FROM BEYOND of course but how do you reflect on what those two films did for you?

 A: A loose quote, but as Herbert West once said, “They gave me life!” I don’t think I would be where I am today without having had the glorious opportunity of working on two beloved films by Stuart Gordon. Those films, especially RE-ANIMATOR launched my career as an actress. I am forever grateful to both Stuart Gordon for giving me the role of Megan Halsey and for the other girl who had it first and turned it down.

 Q: How do you think the Horror genre has changed/evolved over the years since you started out?

 A: That’s a big question! Do you have an hour? In short, as far as I can tell, there are some major things that have evolved. It’s easier than ever to make a movie, anyone can do it, perhaps not well, but anyone can. We have digital instead of film so it’s a faster process. It’s more collaborative than it’s ever been and everyone seems to understand each other’s jobs. There are many more platforms on which to show your work and also one thing has never changed: no one is ever completely satisfied, the artist or the audience. We are smarter and more difficult to please than ever.

 Q: What has been your favourite role so far?

 A: My favourite role so far is the one I am doing right now.

 Q: And the favourite role you’d love to play?

 A: I probably won’t know that until after I have finished it because it’s in the doing of things and the immediacy of performing that I think we get our deepest personal rewards.

JM

What’s your pleasure?

  
Have you ever been browsing Amazon or Zavvi looking for a movie from your childhood, but you just can’t find it? Or maybe you’ve stumbled across some cult weirdness late one night on Channel 4, and you’re wondering where you can get a copy? Well look no further folks. I am pleased to point you to a site where nearly all your cult pleasures can be found. 

  
Twisted Anger is a site chock full of hard to get movies. There are movies that even I haven’t had the pleasure of seeing on there. Want a DVD of Michael Mann’s ‘The Keep’? Then head on over to http://www.twistedanger.com where you can acquire that and much more, it really is a treasure trove of cult greatness folks. 

JM

Do you hear The Voices too?

 
Due for release on 13th July from Arrow Films is the dark comedy The Voices, starring Ryan Reyonlds who begins to behave a little strangely when his cat and dog start talking to him. More info in the press release below:

DVD, BLU-RAY & STEELBOOK

UK RELEASE: MONDAY 13th JULY

“Utterly compelling” – ShortList
“A gory and unexpectedly pleasurable dark comedy” – GQ Magazine
“Like a Wes Anderson nightmare” – New Empress Magazine
  
Arrow Films is pleased to announce the DVD, Blu-Ray and Steelbook (the latter exclusive to Zavvi.com) release of horror-comedy The Voices starring Ryan Reynolds, Gemma Arterton and Anna Kendrick on Monday 13th July.
  
The Voices is directed by Marjane Satrapi, the Iranian author and filmmaker best known for the Academy Award nominated animated film Persepolis (2007). Ryan Reynolds stars as a troubled, med-addicted factory worker driven to murder by his talking pets, a psychopathic cat called Mr. Whiskers and Bosco, his peace-loving dog. Reynolds also voices both of the animals, while Jacki Weaver, Gemma Arterton and Anna Kendrick play the women unfortunate enough to cross his path. The Voices is available as an exclusive SteelBook via Zavvi.com
 
I’m definitely picking this one up and I shall also be reviewing it very soon, so stay tuned. 

JM  

Blood and Black Lace (1964)

 
Directed by Mario Bava, Blood and Black Lace was one of the first giallo’s to be released, but not *the* first as my good friend Kat Ellinger over at http://thegoresplatteredcorner.com/ pointed out to me. I’ll be honest I wasn’t really a fan of some of Bava’s other work like Lisa and the Devil. However that being said Blood and Black Lace really did it for me. 

 
When a beautiful young model is murdered and her body found in a salon the finger is pointed at many who knew her. When her diary is later found it causes many to become worried, as they fear there may be something that could implicate them inside the diary. However has the bodies pile up, and more grisly murders take place, it’s clear there is something far more sinister at play. A masked maniac stalks the women, bumping them off one by one, with the police oblivious to who could be responsible. 

 
Director Mario Bava’s use of colour is extrordinary. They literally pop off the screen, with red being the most prevelant colour. The transfer from Arrow Video is nothing short of sublime. The blacks are rich and deep and the close ups of each actor are vibrant to say the least. It looks like a movie that was made last year and not 51 years ago. My only gripe is the music. Not that it’s terrible, because it isn’t. No, my issue is where it’s used in the movie. It’s far too upbeat to create any tension, so when it’s used in the stalking scenes, I just didn’t feel the tension I felt the director may have been trying to create. Though that really is all I can fault this movie for and that’s saying something. 
 
The acting is great and not at all hammy, like it can be in some Italian movies I’ve seen. The costume and set design is wonderful, and you really do wish you could just step into the movie just for one moment. This copy of Blood and Black Lace was generously provided by the folks at http://www.arrowfilms.co.uk/ and is available to purchase now. It’s available in a steelbook release or in a reversible sleeve jewel case. Personally I’d choose the sublime reversible sleeve with the beautiful Graham Humphreys artwork. 

5/5

JM

  

Maniac Cop sixth scale statue coming soon. 

 

Coming soon is this wonderfully designed Maniac Cop sixth scale statue from the brilliantly talented Jason Davenport. You can contact him on facebook via his Maniac Cop Madness page (https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=555455091203608&tsid=0.6691747179720551&source=typeahead) should you want to get one made for yourself. 

   

The detail is incredible. Below is a colour picture of what the base looks like. The head has been resculpted as shown in the above pictures. 

 

This is seriously worth getting for all you Maniac Cop fans out there. 

JM 

Interview with Made Flesh author/artist pair Lars Kramhoft and Tom Kristensen. 




The american horror publisher Evil Jester just launched the Indie-go-go campaign (link here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/made-flesh) for their upcoming graphic novel “MADE FLESH”, an ambitious, 124-page horror story all in color. The creators of the book are a writer/artist team from Denmark of all places. 

I/WE (?) Horror caught up with the two up-and-coming talents for a quick chat about “Made Flesh” and to figure out why an American publisher believes  these guys will be succesful “over there”:

 

JM: Lars and Tom, can you introduce yourself to our readers?

 

L: Sure. I’m Lars and I’m the writer of “Made Flesh”.I’d like to say thanks for talking to us. This whole crazy journey we’re on is all about the art we make, the fans and friends we meet. It’s so great to feel that people support what you’re doing and now that we have the indie-go-go campaign up and running it really means everything.

 

T: My name is Tom Kristensen. I’m a 32 years old freelance illustrator living in Copenhagen with my lovely girlfriend. I generally work with visual storytelling and try to incorporate the comic book medium in everthing I work on.  

 

JM: Can you tell us a bit about what readers can expect from “Made Flesh”?

 

L: Well, on the surface level it’s a haunted house story about a guy named Michael whose father dies, so he has to travel back to his childhood home with his girlfriend to settle the estate. Already from the beginning Michael is having some problems, he has nightmares and hallucinates. We sense that there is something dark in his past and it is actually threatening his relationship. Of course the past comes back to haunt him – both metaphorically and quite literally, and he has to dig it all up to save himself and his girlfriend. I don’t want to give much more away, but people who are interested should follow the group on Facebook as well as the indiegogo campaign cause we will be posting new material and little bits of extras all through the next thirty days.

Both Tom and I are very ambitious about our art, be it writing or drawing, and when we made “Made Flesh” we comitted to create something genuine and genuinely scary. To be honest, I didn’t know if anyone was going to want to read it, so at some point I just said – fuck it, let’s go all the way. No compromises. Let’s give them hell. So we did – and it paid off. This book is our vision – surreal, visceral, psychological, litterary and artistic, creepy and disgusting. 

 

 T: In regards of the visual experience I wanted Made Flesh to have a strong visual side that would fit the psychological aspects of the story. Things aren’t so clean shaven in the tale so I took the drawings down the rabbit’s hole as well. I decided to approach the artwork with a more of a illustrative feel instead of trying to have everything perfectly inked. The pencils give a lot of nice textures that help setting the mood for this spooky tale

 

JM: Obviously, you are both hugely into horror entertainment, but what can a graphic novel offer in terms of horror that is different from a novel or a film and how did you make “Made Flesh” scary?

 

TI think comics and graphic novels have a huge potential when it comes to tell deep compelling stories. The way graphic novels demands cooperation from the reader. You need to be willing to merge yourself with the artwork and text in order for you to get the full experience. A lot of the story happens in-between panels and the reader needs to make it happen in his og her mind. That is one of the great things about the medium. A picture can hit a lot faster than a page full of words and that’s one of the things that make graphic novels suited for horror. You decide what the reader will see and what she’ll imagine. That’s pretty powerful, if you ask me. You can’t really create shock effects in a physical book unless it’s some sort of crazy popup book (I’d buy it!). So you need to take it in another direction. A much more interesting direction I might add. You need to create real emotions in your characters. They need to feel real in order for the scary things that might happen to them feel real to the reader. You want to work a lot with ambiance and atmosphere.

 

JM: For a lot of writers and artists in comics it can be quite a challenge to find the right people to collaborate with. How did your working together come about? Did you meet a convention, online or somewhere else entirely?

 

T: I wanted to create a graphic novel for my master’s degree at the design school. and I had met Lars at the Animation Workshop’s artists in residency Open Workshop earlier that year. I knew he wanted to write and I needed a story to work with so I asked him if he wanted to write it. Luckily he said yes. After I graduated we decided to finish the book. We’re both very committed to making art and stories so it felt only natural to collaborate.    

 

JM: Like many other up and coming comic book writers and artists, you went the self-publishing way before being picked up by a publisher. How did you go about that? Is it something you will recommend to others?

 

L: We definetely went the DIY-way and to be honest, we worked our asses off. I have always related what we do to punk bands who do everything themselves and sleep on their friends couches when they go touring. I basically spent all my money on self-publishing Made Flesh, and had to go on the dole for a month afterwards. Tom and I would ride our bikes around Copenhagen to get stores to sell our book, and we stood behind our own table at conventions in Denmark, Germany and the UK selling the book. There really is no easy way to do something like this. It’s hard work, but it’s also extremely rewarding because you’re doing what matters to you, and you live life as if it actually mattered  you’re not cheesing itI recommend doing it this way, because the best way to learn something is by actually fucking doing it. You know, Tom and I both have  creative educations, but I still say I my real education was all that time I spent making underground comics, writing and drawing for myself. It teaches you the craft, self-discipline and dedication.  

 




JM: Obviously, getting published is a big deal for all writers and artists. How did you get picked up by Evil Jester?

 

L: Yeah, it’s like, all that hard work and dedication I talked about has paid off, you know? Because first we got published in Denmark. Then we won the award for best Danish horror publication in 2013. Now we’re ready to bring our vision of horror and madness to an even bigger audience. I had already been writing a bit with the editor Charles Day about doing something for them because I knew they were doing awesome stuff, and when we eventually submitted the book to them they pretty much accepted it right away.  

 

Q: So you made the book – and now you want to do it again!? Or what is the deal with the indie-go-go campaign and why should the readers donate their hard-earned money to it?

 

L: The thing is, getting pubslihed in the US doesn’t automatically mean you hang out with Stan Lee and get a big bag of money handed to you. Evil Jester is a small company – they’re a quality publisher, but they’re small. And printing a big, full color comic book is expensive. And that’s not even taking something like marketing into consideration, which is a big part of it too. Obviously we’re not putting this money in our pockets – we’re trying to raise enough that we can publish a really, really, cool version of Made Flesh, hopefully a hardcover. That’s why people should support us if they’re into indie horror and good comics because we put our blood, sweat and tears into this. It’s not some Sunday school trip – we really love horror and we really, really worked hard to create something special here.We also want to make even more books, so if you guys help us here now, we promise you we’re going to deliver on the goods. 


JM: Before starting Made Flesh, was there anything that really inspired you and helped in the creative process?


L: Well, for my part, I had just graduated from animation school and had gotten my bachelor, but I knew I wasn’t going to work with animation. I started to do comics again, but then I just gravitated towards writing more and more. That’s like the context, but to answer your question I would say that someone like Grant Morrison inspired me a lot, because he really opened my eyes to how much you can do with comics. For me, he made comics sexy and rellevant. It was like, when I was reading his books, I would think – yeah, this is the kind of thing I want to do. Like Arkham Asylum which was a huge influence on MF.


T: Yes, I’d done a 112 page danish comic called Deadboy so I knew that I could actually finish a longer story. A lot of the time in the creative process you really just need to believe you can do it. During the time of drawing Made Flesh I went to the library a lot to read comics. I take a lot of inspiration from looking at other comics and say to myself: It they can so can I.





JM: Preacher would also be something that has great writing and isn’t afraid to be daring.


L: Totally! I have like four books that are the hallmark as far as I am concerned, Sandman, Preaher, Hellblazer and The Invisibles. For me, those four books, that time at Vertigo, was the best in horror comics.


JM: That’s what I liked about Made Flesh. It was very daring but treats the reader with respect. I love mature stories like that.


L: Yeah absolutely, I try to make something that I would like to read. I’m really satisfied with all the layers in the story, and how it doesn’t get spelled out, but you get the feeling of a world and a cosmology with spirits and demons even though you are never told exactly how it all works. 


JM: Guys thanks so much for your time. Good luck with the book and the campaign. 


JM

Disturbing Behaviour (1998)



After moving from Chicago to the sleepy town of Cradle Bay, Steve Clark (James Marsden) is enrolled at the local school. He is soon befriended by one of the school outcasts, Gavin Strick (Nick Stahl). Gavin is considered a trouble maker, and is friends with some othe students also considered unruly, one being Rachel Wagner (Katie Holmes)



Gavin and Rachel feel that something sinister is going on in the school, and they think it has something to do with a group of ‘model students’ called the Blue Ribbons. What used to be troublesome students, are now valued members of the community. Gavin and Rachel tell Steve that it has something to do with a doctor called Edgar Caldicott (Bruce Greenwood).





As the students dig deeper into what exactly is happening, they uncover a truth that could cost them all their lives. Director David Nutter who has worked on series like the X-Files, does a very good job at creating tension here. The film moves along at a brisk pace and everyone plays their part really well, with Bruce Greenwood really giving his Dr. Caldicott an air of menace. 



There are great supporting roles from William Sadler as a demented janitor and Steve Railsback as a sinister cop. I really do recommend this if you haven’t seen it before. 

4/5

JM



Housebound (2014)

house5

Kylie Bucknell (Morgana O’Reilly) is sent to stay with her mum for six months under house arrest by the courts when she is caught attempting to steal from an ATM. Her mum Miriam (Rima Te Wiata) is well meaning and wants to try and make Kylie’s stay a good one. Kylie’s attitude is far from sociable however, which only makes the atmosphere in the house worse. Things begin to take a sinister turn when Kylie begins to hear strange noises in the house. Not only that, but things are going missing and Kylie’s mum thinks the house may be haunted.

house4

With the help her probation officer and amateur paranormal investigator, Amos (Glen-Paul Waru), they discover that the house used to be a hostel for mentally disturbed people, and that someone was murdered there years ago. Believing the source of the noises to be a malevolent spirit Kylie and Amos seek to remove it, however the truth it would seem is far stranger.

house3

Really to say any more would spoil the gem of a double twist this movie has going on. I had heard a lot about this and I must say I was blown away by how good it was. It was without a doubt my film of 2014. The cast are all excellent in their respective roles, and the script is top notch. The characters themselves are all very well rounded and impeccably written. There is humour and warmth amongst the action and scares and it all makes for a stellar movie.

house1

I want to be careful I don’t oversell this, but I just can’t help myself. It’s very rare now in the days of shitty reboots and remakes that we get something that on the face of it seems like well trodden ground, but instead delivers one of the freshest pieces of cinema in a long time. I think it’s safe to say you’ll like this.

5/5

JM

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