Maniac Cop sixth scale statue coming soon. 

 

Coming soon is this wonderfully designed Maniac Cop sixth scale statue from the brilliantly talented Jason Davenport. You can contact him on facebook via his Maniac Cop Madness page (https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=555455091203608&tsid=0.6691747179720551&source=typeahead) should you want to get one made for yourself. 

   

The detail is incredible. Below is a colour picture of what the base looks like. The head has been resculpted as shown in the above pictures. 

 

This is seriously worth getting for all you Maniac Cop fans out there. 

JM 

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Captain Rex ‘Phase II Armour’ from Sideshow Collectibles. 

 

As you can see in the above picture, even Captain Rex gives this the thumbs up. What a stunning release this is from the very talented folks over at Sideshow Collectibles. The detail is astounding. There were two releases of Captain Rex, with the first release having him in pristine white armour, and not the battle worn armour you can see in the pictures. That said, I have to say I prefer this one. I love the scuffs and scratches all over his armour. I also like the little notches on his wrists that show you how many enemies he has killed. 

 

The notches are also etched onto the base, which also details Captain Rex’s regiment. Captain Rex can be seen in The Clone Wars series. He is voiced by Dee Bradley Baker in the series, but has the likeness of actor Temuera Morrison who played Jango Fett in the movies, well I think so anyway. 

 

 The head and helmet are interchangeable, but can be a bit fiddly in places. I struggled to fit the head on securely, but the helmet fits on no problem. When I took the Jetpack out of the packaging I did wonder how on earth it would clip on, as there wasn’t any noticeable bits sticking out. I was very pleasantly surprised to find out that it’s magnetised, and actually clips on very nicely. 

 

You get two pistols which can be holstered on Captain Rex’s waist. You also get a very nice blaster rifle which has an underslung shoulder stock. Also included are two grenades and several pairs of interchangeable hands which really add character to the piece. The artists and sculptors at Sideshow really have produced a fine piece here, which will definitely sit proudly amongst my other sixth scale figures. If you are intersted in this figure and would like you get your own, then pop along to http://www.sideshowtoy.com/collectibles/star-wars-captain-rex-sideshow-collectibles-1002221/, where it is available for a very, very reasonable price. Believe me. 

 

I want to thank the fine folks over at http://www.sideshowtoy.com for their generosity in providing this figure for review. It’s thanks to them that I can bring you these fine items to review. Stay tuned for more great toy reviews. 

5/5

JM

 

   

Interview with Made Flesh author/artist pair Lars Kramhoft and Tom Kristensen. 




The american horror publisher Evil Jester just launched the Indie-go-go campaign (link here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/made-flesh) for their upcoming graphic novel “MADE FLESH”, an ambitious, 124-page horror story all in color. The creators of the book are a writer/artist team from Denmark of all places. 

I/WE (?) Horror caught up with the two up-and-coming talents for a quick chat about “Made Flesh” and to figure out why an American publisher believes  these guys will be succesful “over there”:

 

JM: Lars and Tom, can you introduce yourself to our readers?

 

L: Sure. I’m Lars and I’m the writer of “Made Flesh”.I’d like to say thanks for talking to us. This whole crazy journey we’re on is all about the art we make, the fans and friends we meet. It’s so great to feel that people support what you’re doing and now that we have the indie-go-go campaign up and running it really means everything.

 

T: My name is Tom Kristensen. I’m a 32 years old freelance illustrator living in Copenhagen with my lovely girlfriend. I generally work with visual storytelling and try to incorporate the comic book medium in everthing I work on.  

 

JM: Can you tell us a bit about what readers can expect from “Made Flesh”?

 

L: Well, on the surface level it’s a haunted house story about a guy named Michael whose father dies, so he has to travel back to his childhood home with his girlfriend to settle the estate. Already from the beginning Michael is having some problems, he has nightmares and hallucinates. We sense that there is something dark in his past and it is actually threatening his relationship. Of course the past comes back to haunt him – both metaphorically and quite literally, and he has to dig it all up to save himself and his girlfriend. I don’t want to give much more away, but people who are interested should follow the group on Facebook as well as the indiegogo campaign cause we will be posting new material and little bits of extras all through the next thirty days.

Both Tom and I are very ambitious about our art, be it writing or drawing, and when we made “Made Flesh” we comitted to create something genuine and genuinely scary. To be honest, I didn’t know if anyone was going to want to read it, so at some point I just said – fuck it, let’s go all the way. No compromises. Let’s give them hell. So we did – and it paid off. This book is our vision – surreal, visceral, psychological, litterary and artistic, creepy and disgusting. 

 

 T: In regards of the visual experience I wanted Made Flesh to have a strong visual side that would fit the psychological aspects of the story. Things aren’t so clean shaven in the tale so I took the drawings down the rabbit’s hole as well. I decided to approach the artwork with a more of a illustrative feel instead of trying to have everything perfectly inked. The pencils give a lot of nice textures that help setting the mood for this spooky tale

 

JM: Obviously, you are both hugely into horror entertainment, but what can a graphic novel offer in terms of horror that is different from a novel or a film and how did you make “Made Flesh” scary?

 

TI think comics and graphic novels have a huge potential when it comes to tell deep compelling stories. The way graphic novels demands cooperation from the reader. You need to be willing to merge yourself with the artwork and text in order for you to get the full experience. A lot of the story happens in-between panels and the reader needs to make it happen in his og her mind. That is one of the great things about the medium. A picture can hit a lot faster than a page full of words and that’s one of the things that make graphic novels suited for horror. You decide what the reader will see and what she’ll imagine. That’s pretty powerful, if you ask me. You can’t really create shock effects in a physical book unless it’s some sort of crazy popup book (I’d buy it!). So you need to take it in another direction. A much more interesting direction I might add. You need to create real emotions in your characters. They need to feel real in order for the scary things that might happen to them feel real to the reader. You want to work a lot with ambiance and atmosphere.

 

JM: For a lot of writers and artists in comics it can be quite a challenge to find the right people to collaborate with. How did your working together come about? Did you meet a convention, online or somewhere else entirely?

 

T: I wanted to create a graphic novel for my master’s degree at the design school. and I had met Lars at the Animation Workshop’s artists in residency Open Workshop earlier that year. I knew he wanted to write and I needed a story to work with so I asked him if he wanted to write it. Luckily he said yes. After I graduated we decided to finish the book. We’re both very committed to making art and stories so it felt only natural to collaborate.    

 

JM: Like many other up and coming comic book writers and artists, you went the self-publishing way before being picked up by a publisher. How did you go about that? Is it something you will recommend to others?

 

L: We definetely went the DIY-way and to be honest, we worked our asses off. I have always related what we do to punk bands who do everything themselves and sleep on their friends couches when they go touring. I basically spent all my money on self-publishing Made Flesh, and had to go on the dole for a month afterwards. Tom and I would ride our bikes around Copenhagen to get stores to sell our book, and we stood behind our own table at conventions in Denmark, Germany and the UK selling the book. There really is no easy way to do something like this. It’s hard work, but it’s also extremely rewarding because you’re doing what matters to you, and you live life as if it actually mattered  you’re not cheesing itI recommend doing it this way, because the best way to learn something is by actually fucking doing it. You know, Tom and I both have  creative educations, but I still say I my real education was all that time I spent making underground comics, writing and drawing for myself. It teaches you the craft, self-discipline and dedication.  

 




JM: Obviously, getting published is a big deal for all writers and artists. How did you get picked up by Evil Jester?

 

L: Yeah, it’s like, all that hard work and dedication I talked about has paid off, you know? Because first we got published in Denmark. Then we won the award for best Danish horror publication in 2013. Now we’re ready to bring our vision of horror and madness to an even bigger audience. I had already been writing a bit with the editor Charles Day about doing something for them because I knew they were doing awesome stuff, and when we eventually submitted the book to them they pretty much accepted it right away.  

 

Q: So you made the book – and now you want to do it again!? Or what is the deal with the indie-go-go campaign and why should the readers donate their hard-earned money to it?

 

L: The thing is, getting pubslihed in the US doesn’t automatically mean you hang out with Stan Lee and get a big bag of money handed to you. Evil Jester is a small company – they’re a quality publisher, but they’re small. And printing a big, full color comic book is expensive. And that’s not even taking something like marketing into consideration, which is a big part of it too. Obviously we’re not putting this money in our pockets – we’re trying to raise enough that we can publish a really, really, cool version of Made Flesh, hopefully a hardcover. That’s why people should support us if they’re into indie horror and good comics because we put our blood, sweat and tears into this. It’s not some Sunday school trip – we really love horror and we really, really worked hard to create something special here.We also want to make even more books, so if you guys help us here now, we promise you we’re going to deliver on the goods. 


JM: Before starting Made Flesh, was there anything that really inspired you and helped in the creative process?


L: Well, for my part, I had just graduated from animation school and had gotten my bachelor, but I knew I wasn’t going to work with animation. I started to do comics again, but then I just gravitated towards writing more and more. That’s like the context, but to answer your question I would say that someone like Grant Morrison inspired me a lot, because he really opened my eyes to how much you can do with comics. For me, he made comics sexy and rellevant. It was like, when I was reading his books, I would think – yeah, this is the kind of thing I want to do. Like Arkham Asylum which was a huge influence on MF.


T: Yes, I’d done a 112 page danish comic called Deadboy so I knew that I could actually finish a longer story. A lot of the time in the creative process you really just need to believe you can do it. During the time of drawing Made Flesh I went to the library a lot to read comics. I take a lot of inspiration from looking at other comics and say to myself: It they can so can I.





JM: Preacher would also be something that has great writing and isn’t afraid to be daring.


L: Totally! I have like four books that are the hallmark as far as I am concerned, Sandman, Preaher, Hellblazer and The Invisibles. For me, those four books, that time at Vertigo, was the best in horror comics.


JM: That’s what I liked about Made Flesh. It was very daring but treats the reader with respect. I love mature stories like that.


L: Yeah absolutely, I try to make something that I would like to read. I’m really satisfied with all the layers in the story, and how it doesn’t get spelled out, but you get the feeling of a world and a cosmology with spirits and demons even though you are never told exactly how it all works. 


JM: Guys thanks so much for your time. Good luck with the book and the campaign. 


JM

Korea is where it’s at!

This is for all the collectors out there. For me Korea has been the go to place for collectors editions of movies. The folks at Plain Archive, Nova Media and KimchiDVD put so much effort into their releases it’s staggering. 





They’re the logos you want to be looking out for. Seriously, there has been some great releases coming from Korea, with I Saw The Devil from Plain Archive, Drive from Nova Media and the Amelie triple pack from Kimchi being the standouts. 





I highly recommend checking their sites out for upcoming releases. 

JM



Disturbing Behaviour (1998)



After moving from Chicago to the sleepy town of Cradle Bay, Steve Clark (James Marsden) is enrolled at the local school. He is soon befriended by one of the school outcasts, Gavin Strick (Nick Stahl). Gavin is considered a trouble maker, and is friends with some othe students also considered unruly, one being Rachel Wagner (Katie Holmes)



Gavin and Rachel feel that something sinister is going on in the school, and they think it has something to do with a group of ‘model students’ called the Blue Ribbons. What used to be troublesome students, are now valued members of the community. Gavin and Rachel tell Steve that it has something to do with a doctor called Edgar Caldicott (Bruce Greenwood).





As the students dig deeper into what exactly is happening, they uncover a truth that could cost them all their lives. Director David Nutter who has worked on series like the X-Files, does a very good job at creating tension here. The film moves along at a brisk pace and everyone plays their part really well, with Bruce Greenwood really giving his Dr. Caldicott an air of menace. 



There are great supporting roles from William Sadler as a demented janitor and Steve Railsback as a sinister cop. I really do recommend this if you haven’t seen it before. 

4/5

JM